Enter Your Firm’s Best Work to Win a 2017 Thoth Award from PRSA-NCC

By: Jillian Cameron, News Generation, Inc.

The 48th Annual Thoth Awards, hosted by the Public Relations Society of America National Capital Chapter, recognizes and celebrates outstanding strategic public relations programs and components created in the Greater Washington, D.C. area.

Named for the Egyptian god of communication, the Thoth Awards (pronounced “tot”), is the National Capital Chapter of PRSA’s local version of the Silver Anvils. Previous winners include the National Education Association and Ogilvy Washington’s Bring Your Brave Campaign, among many others. The awards recognize work in public relations across 34 categories, ranging from public relations campaigns to tactics.

Entry to the 2017 Thoth Awards is open to both PRSA-NCC members and non-members, and will be open until Monday, June 24, 2017. But why should you apply to the 2017 Thoth Awards? As Raymond Crosby, President & CEO of Crosby Marketing Communications, puts it:

“The Thoth Awards are really worthwhile because the entries are judged by industry peers who know how to recognize great work that gets real results.  The greater Washington, DC region has a lot of high profile agencies and organizations that participate in this competition, so winning a Thoth says you’re the best of the best.”

This year’s Thoth Awards Gala will be held at the National Press Club on Thursday, October 12, from 6:00 to 9:00 pm. Still not convinced the Thoth Awards are for you? Here are some more testimonials from leaders in the Greater Washington, D.C. area public relations community:

“The PRSA-NCC Chapter is the largest PRSA in the country. The communications work produced in the metropolitan D.C. area is national-caliber work. Therefore, to win a Thoth Award is truly a great honor.”

– Jeff Wilson, Vice President, Padilla

“At News Generation, personal interaction with our clients is a huge priority. Being a finalist for a Thoth Award is a great opportunity to invite your clients with whom you entered to spend the evening with you at the Gala. The recognition of being a finalist or a winner positions your client as a thought-leader in the industry in front of peers. It has been a great way for us to continue to grow our relationships with clients, and shows them that the value we are providing them is strong enough to be recognized on such a large scale.”

– Kelsey Pospisil O’Planick, News Generation, Inc.

“For me, as a federal government communicator, the Thoth Award was certainly about recognition, . but so much more, too. It was exhilarating and incredibly satisfying for the entire team at the US Department of Labor to not only “go up against” work done by major corporations, international PR firms and influential trade associations, but to actually win? That was amazing! I knew that our work was as good, or even better, than work done by more experienced and bigger (including budget) Washington area PR professionals. Winning a Thoth proved it. And it was an incomparable morale booster–team members walked a little straighter and held their head up a little higher for weeks after the award ceremony.

This part isn’t as glamourous or exciting, but I think it’s still very important: The application process is a very worthwhile endeavor. It is rigorous and time-consuming, there is no doubt about that. But it makes you think (and think hard); it makes you ask yourself tough questions about your program and its results; it makes you write, and rewrite and edit; and it forces you to defend your project. You can’t just say it was great, you have to prove it. Too often, we don’t have the time to “post mortem” a project (we’re on to the next crisis). Working on the Thoth application gives you an opportunity for serious reflection and professional introspection. Everybody needs to do more of that. Especially PR people!

There was an unexpected benefit of winning several Thoth Awards, as well as winning a PRSA Silver Anvil and Bronze Anvil: our shop became known as a real talent destination—and not just in the federal space, but throughout the Washington, DC public relations community. Recruiting talent became easier (and we attracted the truly best and brightest) because we were an award-winning shop, just as cool and creative and exciting as the boutique PR agency of the moment. The team was certainly proud of that, and applicants very much wanted to be a part of it.”

– Carl Fillichio, Weedmaps, formerly of U.S. Department of Labor

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Five Ways to Know if Your PR Campaign is Thoth Award Material

*Originally published on May 23, 2016; For the 2017 Thoth Award deadlines, see dates below this article.

By Robert V. Krueger, Senior Director, Public Relations & Social Media at the Urban Land Institute

From left to right: Sandra Wills Hannon, Ph.D., APR, Principal, The Hannon Group, @Willshannon; Jeff Wilson, APR, Senior Director, Business Develoment & Agency Marketing, PadillaCRT, @Wilson0507; Brigitte Johnson, APR, Adjunct Professor, Marymount University, @JohnsonHerronB; and standing Sultana Ali, APR, PRSA-NCC

From left to right: Sandra Wills Hannon, Ph.D., APR, Principal, The Hannon Group, @Willshannon; Jeff Wilson, APR, Senior Director, Business Develoment & Agency Marketing, PadillaCRT, @Wilson0507; Brigitte Johnson, APR, Adjunct Professor, Marymount University, @JohnsonHerronB; and standing Sultana Ali, APR, PRSA-NCC

Every week public relations agencies, non-profits, government agencies, and private in-house communications teams research, design, and execute a variety of campaigns that help their clients achieve certain goals. But, many outstanding campaigns never receive their due recognition.

For years, public relations practitioners have entered their campaigns into industry competitions. In addition, it can be seen as a badge of honor for organizations and individuals to attach a communications award to their portfolio. But, submitting entries for a Public Relations Society of America – National Capital Chapter (PRSA-NCC) Thoth Award or any other PR and communication award can be an intimidating process that is full of uncertainty.

A recent PRSA-NCC panel offered insight into the process and sought to break any myths surrounding what types of campaigns – both big and small – are worthy of winning Washington’s most prestigious award.  The panelists were: Jeff Wilson, APR, Senior Director, Business Development & Agency Marketing, PadillaCRT; Sandra Wills Hannon, Ph.D., APR, Principal, The Hannon Group; Brigitte Johnson, APR, Adjunct Professor, Marymount University; and the discussion was moderated by Sultana Ali, APR, PRSA-NCC President & Communications Officer at The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Based on their discussion, below is a list of five ways you can decide whether your campaign should be submitted for a Thoth award:

  1. Perform a broad-stroke litmus test: First ask yourself whether your campaign was compelling and whether there were clear, measurable objectives that were achieved. Second, did it include a well-designed and clear strategic plan or was it simply tactical? Third, was it beautifully executed? Finally, and perhaps most importantly, is there evidence that your goals were achieved?
  2. Check if there was a clear demonstration of research: If you pass the litmus test, you must be able to prove you utilized primary and/or secondary research in designing your plan. Judges of any PR competition always want to see a foundation of research. Before developing a campaign, you should do an environmental scan and see if there is any secondary research available that is applicable to your goals. In addition, even if you do not have the budget to conduct primary research, many organizations choose the more affordable route and latch on to other firms’ research through omnibus.
  3. Determine whether the execution was both targeted and strategic: Was your campaign planning targeted and based on your research? Did you have a primary and secondary audience? If securing media placements was one of your tactics, did the outlets that covered you make sense regarding target audience and objectives?
  4. Evaluate whether your results were both measurable and mirrored your objectives: Was the execution appropriate to the audience you were targeting? Did the target of the execution match the target audience of your client’s goals? Also determine whether your campaign results data proved whether goals were achieved. When doing this, make sure each result matches each stated objective.
  5. Be able to state your client’s problem and how you solved it: Judges always want to see if your submission can explain what the problem was for your client—and how your campaign helped solve that problem.
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Susan Matthews Apgood, News Generation, Inc., kicks off the event

Of course it is always best to keep these things in mind before you research and design a campaign. The panel suggested to always craft a campaign as if you would one day submit it to a competition. An additional piece of advice offered was to serve as a judge for other communication competitions, get additional training through PRSA’s APR accreditation, and to review the entries of winning submissions – all which can help you become familiar with the components of a winning entry.

*Updated from original post:
The early bird deadline is Friday, June 30, 2017, and the final deadline is July 24, 2017. For details on submitting, please visit: http://www.prsa-ncc.org/thoth_awards.