Looking for Agencies in all the Wrong Places

By Robert Udowitz, RFP Associates

Whether you’re on the agency or client side of public relations, you’ve no doubt encountered the Request for Proposal – or simply, RFP. It’s a bane to most everyone’s existence for a multitude of reasons yet, by design, it truly is the best way to solicit PR services or respond to the need for them.

Naysayers forget that RFPs span most industries and are a generally accepted method of doing business. In fact, when done well – and by that, I mean comprehensively and transparent – they should serve as the most efficient method of agency selection.

In today’s frantic-paced communications departments it’s difficult to devote the resources to create an RFP and identify the right agencies. But how can you consider hiring a public relations firm that you’re willing to pay, say, $250k or more a year – equal to the cost of several employees – without taking the proper precautions to screen, review, test, and verify those firms?

The average search takes 150-200 hours. Surprised? Look at your clock and consider that you need to build a review team, develop the budget, draft the initial RFP, pre-screen agencies (to ensure expertise and eliminate those with conflicts), read/re-read and evaluate all those responses, schedule presentations, and then make a final selection – all while you manage your department without the agency you desperately need.

So what should you do? Here are a few ideas:

  • When searching for an agency, first look inward. Assess your goals and needs AND your current structure’s ability to manage an outside firm.
  • Build an initial search team to set the tone and goals. Doing so will commit a group to strict responsibilities and deadlines that have to be adhered.
  • Create a scorecard from the very beginning, too, so each step of the way you can fairly evaluate and compare what each agency has to offer.

Today’s pool of agency choices is greater than ever before. The large firms have expanded their services and built fully integrated teams. On the other hand, there are many good, smaller specialty firms and independent practitioners that have sprung up that are nimble and cost-effective.

The time and effort it takes to hire a PR firm should begin a long and mutually beneficial relationship. By putting the necessary time, thought and energy on the front-end you’ll become a much more satisfied client that never has to look back with regrets and bemoan your agency to colleagues.

About the Author

Robert Udowitz is a principal with agency search firm RFP Associates, LLC. He can be found at www.rfpassociates.net

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