Back to Basics: Sticking to Change Management Fundamentals in Navigating Trump Administration

By Robert Krueger

Political polls and pundits led the public to believe that President Donald Trump had an unlikely chance of winning the General Election.  Not only were American citizens surprised by the news on the morning of Nov. 9, 2016, but so were many leaders in the association, corporate, and nonprofit sectors. After spending months preparing and building relationships with potential appointees in a Hillary Clinton cabinet, these leaders were caught off guard and without plans for how to navigate an unpredicted set of policy and budget priorities in the Trump Administration.

170323-bIn a recent event hosted by the National Capital Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA-NCC) entitled The Trump Era: How DC Communicators are Capitalizing on Change, panelists addressed how their communications teams are responding to unforeseen changes and how the current Administration’s new focus impacts their organization’s reputation, advocacy efforts, and communication goal strategies.

Greg Staley, senior vice president of communications for the U.S. Travel Association, noted that despite the quick shift in planned messaging, his organization approaches the Trump Administration the same as they would approach any change in Administration. His association is focusing on educating the new Adminstration on the importance of travel industry to the overall U.S. economy.

This same point was echoed by panelist Jamie Hennigan. As Vice President of Strategic Communications for the National Association of Manufacturers, Hennigan said that a big focus of their messaging strategy is to educate Trump officials about the makeup of today’s manufacturing workforce. Contrary to the type of manufacturing job that the Administration has been speaking about in the first 100 days, the traditional manual factory floor laborer, characteristic of Rust Belt cities in the mid-1900s, has not been growing over the past three decades. Instead, the manufacturing sector is now extremely diverse and its workforce skews young.

“It is also important to remember that we also elected new members of Congress, so it involves educating them as well and getting them up to speed. As with every new President, we look to build new bridges and we expect everything to be just fine,” Staley added.

When asked about what have been the biggest changes to their communications role since Trump’s inauguration, panelists reported expanded roles and involvement with overall strategy.  According to Hennigan, his communications team is focused more on recruiting digital-first talent due to their increased importance within the organization.  Members of his team are now regularly at the table for any policy decision since any external communication, including a simple email to members, can potentially turn into a bad situation if not careful with messaging.

“I am now part of meetings that I have never been part of before,” said Michael McManus, vice president of corporate communications and government affairs for Asia Pulp and Paper. “I am now part of expansion and investment meetings, among others. If you are in the market, organizations are looking for people with expertise in government relations and communications to provide them with information and sound advice.”

 

How You Can Achieve With Your Communications Campaign by Adopting the PESO Model

By Ailis Wolf

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From left to right: Tyler Suiters, Tara Dunion, Robert Krueger, Dan Higgins, and Sultana Ali.

PR professionals have long seen the need to develop skills traditionally part of the marketing and advertising space. And all communications professionals have been aware of the power of integrating social media as part of a good communications plan.

On Thursday, Oct. 20, PRSA-NCC’s Professional Development Committee hosted, “The PESO Model: Success Requires Communicators Now Adopt a Paid, Earned, Shared & Owned Strategy.” Moderated by the Urban Land Institute’s Robert Krueger, panelists Dan Higgins, director of social and content marketing for the PlowShare Group, Tara Dunion, director of media relations for AARP and the AARP Foundation, and Tyler Suiters, vice president of communications for the Consumer Technology Association discussed how using the PESO model has allowed them to achieve high-impact results for their organizations and clients.

Dunion started by sharing a recent challenge the AARP Foundation faced – recruiting enough volunteers to pack 1.5 million meals for needy seniors across the Washington, D.C. region in one day and obtaining media and social media coverage of the event. They focused paid efforts on volunteer recruitment and included a bus wrap, ads on Pandora and some other social media, and a paid media partnership with NBC4. The media partnership with NBC4 included a social media takeover and, although paid partnerships don’t promise media coverage, this one generated earned coverage on NBC4. A story also ran on the front page of the Metro section of The Washington Post and Lindsey Mastis from ABC7 also did a Facebook Live at the event. The social media promotion ended up helping them reach 3.17 million people and meet their goal of 1.5 million meals for needy seniors.

Higgins presented next and first introduced the five principles everyone needs to keep in mind when employing a PESO strategy –

  • Attention economy – Audience attention is scarce, since people have so many choices about what and how they consume information. Individuals determine what they want to see based on ease of use and we need to keep that in mind.
  • Data – PR professionals may not need to do a deep dive but do need to know the basics about how to attribute campaign success with data.
  • Audience at scale – Know how to reach your audience with paid media – targeting is key.
  • Fragmentation versus convergence – Although there is a fragmentation of media sources, there has also been a convergence. You can put information out on various social media platforms and pitch to traditional media and it can be complementary.
  • Evolved content system – Keep in mind you want your content to last longer to be seen by more people. Users come to content from various sources so look at how to optimize everything, from content on your own website to ads you place elsewhere to social media, to keep users in contact with your content longer.

Suiters said there are three questions you should always ask before engagement to guide your strategy:

  • Who’s your audience?
  • What’s your narrative?
  • Which is your platform?

At CTA, Suiters said they start by doing a deep dive into the data to understand their audience. They look at demographic data to determine what platform is best to reach the audience they are targeting and consider who is most likely to take action, if that is part of their campaign. For a ports campaign encouraging supporters to write their elected officials, CTA pulled news stories about a slowdown at West Coast ports and assembled them into a video, which they pushed out on social media. They ended up with 3,000 messages being sent to 100 senators, 424 representatives and 900+ emails going to the White House.

A key takeaway from the Q&A that followed backed up what Suiters said about understanding your audience being the first thing to do when planning a communications strategy. Higgins stated it’s about getting to the right people at the right time but it’s also about considering all of the platforms and whether your audience uses them and how they interact with each. Suiters told the audience to make it as easy as possible for the audience to get to your content, stay with it, and share it.

Krueger asked the panelists how to convince nonprofits to put money towards campaigns when there are limited resources, even if you are operating within one. Dunion responded by suggesting minimum funding towards the right paid tactics with proper targeting can go a long way, particularly in the crowded marketplace of social media. Suiters suggested using data to show how a particular strategy or tactic can deliver results for the audience you want to reach.

For details on upcoming PRSA-NCC events, visit www.prsa-ncc.org/events.

Know Your Audience, Understand Your Brand’s Voice, and When to Report ROI

By Simran Kumar, News Generation, Inc.

brand1

From L–R: Emily Zeigenfuse, Josh Habursky and Mike Fulton

On Thursday, September 15, PRSA-NCC’s Professional Development committee hosted “Social Media: Staying on Message and on Brand.” Moderated by the Asher Agency’s Mike Fulton, with panelists Josh Habursky, Director of Advocacy, Independent Community Bankers of America, and Emily Zeigenfuse, Senior Digital Strategist, Hager Sharp, the discussion focused around the changing social media landscape. Habursky and Zeigenfuse offered tips on how to stay on brand and maximize budgets while researching audiences on the appropriate social media platform.

Habursky started the discussion by emphasizing the importance of understanding the brand’s voice and message. Zeigenfuse continued by encouraging PR pros to be sure to craft messaging that resonates with the desired target audience. She also talked about creating content that is unique to each channel and understanding who is using which channel.

brand2When it comes to staying “on brand,” Habursky said it’s necessary to know what a brand’s “untouchables” are. For example, the McDonald’s arches are signature to the McDonald’s brand. As communications professionals, it would be unreasonable to try to change something so iconic. According to Zeigenfuse, it’s important to go back to basics, and understand what a brand or client’s end goals are in terms of social media campaigns and then work backward to meet them.

For all social media campaigns, the ability to show ROI to management is key. Habursky talked about being sure to show tangible results. Zeigenfuse echoed Habursky, and said the ideal measure of success depends on a client and their end goals. As for how often to report results, both Habursky and Zeigenfuse said it depends on whether a campaign is paid or unpaid, and that when it’s a paid campaign, it’s often necessary to report more often to determine if messaging should be changed.

brand3If you’re struggling to convince senior management to pursue a social media strategy, Habursky stressed the importance of having an advocate within your organization that’s going to be first follower. Zeigenfuse also talked about being able to show senior leadership why it’s important to have a presence on social media. When collaborating with digital influencers, Zeigenfuse talked about the importance of trying to work with someone who is passionate about the specific organization’s cause. Haburksy stressed the importance of building a relationship and showing an influencer the value of getting involved with the organization.

As for future social media changes, Haburksy said he’s recently looked at what presidential candidates are doing as they usually use innovative techniques. For Zeigenfuse, one of the next big changes will be related to content publishing.

The lively discussion with Habursky and Zeingenfuse offered the audience takeaways for staying on message and on brand on social media and tips for keeping up with changing trends in the industry.

For details on upcoming PRSA-NCC events, visit www.prsa-ncc.org/events.

The Meaning Behind Words: Bates Delivers an Acclaimed Workshop for More Powerful Writing

by Alex Hopkins, Communications Associate, Union Plus

Don Bates at Writing Workshop; Photo credit Danielle Heiny/@DanielleHeiny

Don Bates at Writing Workshop; Photo credit Danielle Heiny/@DanielleHeiny

As communicators, we may take for granted that digital communications has quickly become an integral part of the global infrastructure. When our blogs, press releases, and other writing materials appear on the internet, our words contribute to a make-or-break digital paper trail that not only raises awareness of our employer’s image, but also of our own personal brand. Words thus have more power than ever to become motivators for a vast audience to think and act according to our employer’s communications agenda. For many years, this is what veteran public relations expert Don Bates has taught to communicators both in D.C. and New York City.

On August 18, Bates delivered his popular workshop “Write More Powerfully & Strategically for Public Relations & Public Affairs Purposes in Social and Traditional Media” at Hager Sharp. With over 30 participants, the all-day event gave practitioners the opportunity to form meaningful relationships and work together to turn average written pieces into perfectly-polished prose. Throughout the workshop, participants learned that their teamwork reflected Bates’ observation that communicators should be marshaling their audience to work together to discern and accomplish common goals.

Bates was also joined by Anthony Shop, the Co-Founder and Chief Strategy Officer of Social Driver, a digital marketing agency based in D.C. In a departure from the traditional top-down marketing approach of the past, Shop observed in his well-regarded presentation that “social media democratizes information — even if there is a lot of ‘noise.’” Using the analogy of a lightning strike, Shop said that, although marketers may only see lightning coming top-down, the energy sparks actually come from the ground — much like how audiences are increasingly calling the shots in a bottom-up marketing approach. With the ability of just about anyone to become a digital communicator, Shop taught participants that, because there is more feedback than ever from targeted audiences, communicators must use increasingly-original techniques to raise brand awareness amidst the marketing storm of “noise” around them.

By the end of the day, participants received a treasure-trove of Bates’ knowledge in the form of 100+ page binder that they could took back to work with them. What the participants learned from the event reflected the universal acclaim of the exercises and presentations. Remarking on Bates’ insistence on concise writing, one participant said, “I’m going to challenge myself to write tweets that are less than 140 characters.” Another participant agreed, adding, “I’m going to think more of how I can work together with my audience before I write.”

Interested in the workshop? Bates and the PRSA-NCC will again host the workshop in December. To register, visit: https://www.prsa-ncc.org/write-more-powerfully-strategically-public-relations-public-affairs-purposes-traditional-and-social.

Michael Smart delivered a solid repeat performance on June 29 of his two half-day workshops: Pitching Bootcamp and Building Media Relationships

Session One – Pitching Bootcamp: by Ana Pinilla, BusinessWire

Michael SmartThe Morning Session “Pitching Bootcamp” started with Michael talking about the problems PR practitioners can encounter when pitching journalists and went on to offer his “pitching playbook” where he discussed several examples of how to do it right – starting off with turning a press release from boring to glowing – making it into something newsworthy that journalists will want to use as part of their reporting.  It’s also about finding the angle for the story – one that could be holiday or seasonally related, a story with human impact, or even proximity to where we live and work, as well as other ideas. Michael went on to discuss the anatomy of a perfect pitch that included appropriate phone and/or email introductions and how to deliver the story with speed and interest. But with all this being said, success also depends on knowing the journalists – what they write about and knowing their style. What was particularly helpful was that Michael provided audio and video examples of pitches – with lots of do’s and don’ts – that made it all so much easier and real to attendees.

 

Session Two – Going Beyond the Pitch: Why Relationship Building Matters: by , News Generation

Michael SmartAs PR pros, we know the importance of building and strengthening our relationships with reporters. This was the focus of PRSA-NCC’s recent series of workshops with media relations expert Michael Smart. During the workshops, Smart offered participants hands-on, practical tips and social media suggestions on how to engage and build relationships with members of the media.

The most important theme he stressed is that you must invest in your relationships with the media. Invest the time and brain space. It is a critical component of your job and helps us be more effective at what we do.

Also, pay attention to what journalists are covering. Engage with their material. Show them that you are following them, that you genuinely care about what they’re reporting. Doing so will help separate you from other PR pros. Learn their style and pitch them in a personal, customized way, and become a credible resource to journalists. When pitching, it’s equally important to show that that we’re respectful of a journalist’s time and deadlines.

(*re-published from News Generation: http://www.newsgeneration.com/2016/07/01/relationship-building-matters-michael-smart-prsa/)

Finding the Best Research Method: PRSA-NCC Event

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Pictured: Molly O’Rourke, Sultana Ali, Danny Selnick, Peter Kelley

Pictured: Molly O’Rourke, Sultana Ali, Danny Selnick, Peter Kelley

Research plays an imperative role in the way we communicate messages and attract consumers. Research can be performed internally, using an outside company’s help, or through an external source. The steps to conduct effective research were discussed during the June 16th PRSA event, “Numbers Don’t Lie: The Role of Research in Successful Communications.” Moderator Danny Selnick, Senior Vice President of Strategic Markets at Business Wire, panelists Molly O’Rourke, Partner at Hart Research and Peter Kelley, Vice President of Public Affairs at American Wind Energy Association, evaluated the importance of research in the communications industry.

Molly O’Rourke offered key takeaways on the role of strategic communication and public opinion research in a corporate environment. She emphasized that having strong research can attract media attention, enhance communication abilities, assist with gaining political allies, identify a target market, and increase internal company effectiveness. Important choices to make when conducting research include whether to use a focus group or survey, choosing the most effective sample size, and what audience should be included in the research.

Peter Kelley discussed the importance of accessing free research and how to limit research costs for companies with smaller budgets. Kelley outlined options for “polling without your own pollster” in order to reduce operating costs for your company. In the age of the internet, research can easily be accessed for free. Benefits of opinion research include having the ability to refine messages from gathered information. Oftentimes, using big name pollsters or bipartisan research groups is recommended because they resonate more support with the public.

Moderator Danny Selnick addressed the question of the role of cell phones in making polling more difficult. O’Rourke responded by emphasizing methodological issues in this technological age and how one should go about using different platforms for polling. Hybrid research methods of using online and phone surveys are often used to address a larger market and to receive wider audience participation. Platforms for polling are constantly changing and it is difficult to say one clear cut method is the best. Kelley made clear that transparency is key if you want to eliminate skepticism in the audience to attract a larger support base for your poll. Both emphasized the importance of wording and using unbiased phrases when polling.

Research plays an important role in our lives, and is necessary in continuing company growth and development. Businesses are able to better understand their target audience with imperial data, and the company is able to adjust their messages to be more successful. Research is both an art and a science —you have to try different methods to find what works best.

Stay tuned…

 

(*re-published from News Generation: http://www.newsgeneration.com/2016/06/20/research-method-prsancc/)

Five Ways to Know if Your PR Campaign is Thoth Award Material

*Originally published on May 23, 2016; For the 2017 Thoth Award deadlines, see dates below this article.

By Robert V. Krueger, Senior Director, Public Relations & Social Media at the Urban Land Institute

From left to right: Sandra Wills Hannon, Ph.D., APR, Principal, The Hannon Group, @Willshannon; Jeff Wilson, APR, Senior Director, Business Develoment & Agency Marketing, PadillaCRT, @Wilson0507; Brigitte Johnson, APR, Adjunct Professor, Marymount University, @JohnsonHerronB; and standing Sultana Ali, APR, PRSA-NCC

From left to right: Sandra Wills Hannon, Ph.D., APR, Principal, The Hannon Group, @Willshannon; Jeff Wilson, APR, Senior Director, Business Develoment & Agency Marketing, PadillaCRT, @Wilson0507; Brigitte Johnson, APR, Adjunct Professor, Marymount University, @JohnsonHerronB; and standing Sultana Ali, APR, PRSA-NCC

Every week public relations agencies, non-profits, government agencies, and private in-house communications teams research, design, and execute a variety of campaigns that help their clients achieve certain goals. But, many outstanding campaigns never receive their due recognition.

For years, public relations practitioners have entered their campaigns into industry competitions. In addition, it can be seen as a badge of honor for organizations and individuals to attach a communications award to their portfolio. But, submitting entries for a Public Relations Society of America – National Capital Chapter (PRSA-NCC) Thoth Award or any other PR and communication award can be an intimidating process that is full of uncertainty.

A recent PRSA-NCC panel offered insight into the process and sought to break any myths surrounding what types of campaigns – both big and small – are worthy of winning Washington’s most prestigious award.  The panelists were: Jeff Wilson, APR, Senior Director, Business Development & Agency Marketing, PadillaCRT; Sandra Wills Hannon, Ph.D., APR, Principal, The Hannon Group; Brigitte Johnson, APR, Adjunct Professor, Marymount University; and the discussion was moderated by Sultana Ali, APR, PRSA-NCC President & Communications Officer at The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Based on their discussion, below is a list of five ways you can decide whether your campaign should be submitted for a Thoth award:

  1. Perform a broad-stroke litmus test: First ask yourself whether your campaign was compelling and whether there were clear, measurable objectives that were achieved. Second, did it include a well-designed and clear strategic plan or was it simply tactical? Third, was it beautifully executed? Finally, and perhaps most importantly, is there evidence that your goals were achieved?
  2. Check if there was a clear demonstration of research: If you pass the litmus test, you must be able to prove you utilized primary and/or secondary research in designing your plan. Judges of any PR competition always want to see a foundation of research. Before developing a campaign, you should do an environmental scan and see if there is any secondary research available that is applicable to your goals. In addition, even if you do not have the budget to conduct primary research, many organizations choose the more affordable route and latch on to other firms’ research through omnibus.
  3. Determine whether the execution was both targeted and strategic: Was your campaign planning targeted and based on your research? Did you have a primary and secondary audience? If securing media placements was one of your tactics, did the outlets that covered you make sense regarding target audience and objectives?
  4. Evaluate whether your results were both measurable and mirrored your objectives: Was the execution appropriate to the audience you were targeting? Did the target of the execution match the target audience of your client’s goals? Also determine whether your campaign results data proved whether goals were achieved. When doing this, make sure each result matches each stated objective.
  5. Be able to state your client’s problem and how you solved it: Judges always want to see if your submission can explain what the problem was for your client—and how your campaign helped solve that problem.
thoth2

Susan Matthews Apgood, News Generation, Inc., kicks off the event

Of course it is always best to keep these things in mind before you research and design a campaign. The panel suggested to always craft a campaign as if you would one day submit it to a competition. An additional piece of advice offered was to serve as a judge for other communication competitions, get additional training through PRSA’s APR accreditation, and to review the entries of winning submissions – all which can help you become familiar with the components of a winning entry.

*Updated from original post:
The early bird deadline is Friday, June 30, 2017, and the final deadline is July 24, 2017. For details on submitting, please visit: http://www.prsa-ncc.org/thoth_awards.