Seven Tips for New Graduates: How to Launch a Successful PR Career

Seven Tips for New Graduates How to Launch a Successful PR Career

By Jen Bemisderfer

I recently attended commencement ceremonies for my alma matter, North Carolina State University. As I sat, waiting for thousands of graduates to stream to their seats inside the arena, I thought back to my own graduation, nearly 20 years ago. To be honest, I didn’t remember much about the day. Who was the speaker? What advice did they deliver? How did I feel? Was I excited? Scared?

For what is supposed to be one of life’s biggest milestones, my memory was fuzzy. What I do remember – clearly – is the first day of my first job. The first day of the rest of my life. I’d had internships in college, but this was different. I had a salary! Healthcare! A 401k! And lots to learn about building a successful career in PR.

For all the new graduates who will be flooding in to the National Capital Area ready to tackle the first day of the rest of YOUR lives, I wanted to share a few tips I’ve learned along the way, as well as some advice from my colleagues at RH Strategic Communications – many of whom have been in your shoes more recently!

Cultivate your network.

You might not know it, but you already have a network. Stay in touch with your professors, your friends from PRSSA and your internship supervisors. Even if you’re making a leap to a brand-new city, make the effort to stay connected. As you grow in your career, you’ll add co-workers, supervisors, even your roommates and friends who are in relevant or adjacent fields. You never know how a connection to someone may lead to a dream job, mutually beneficial relationship or just an interesting conversation.

Take time to read the news.

Any entry level job in PR is going to include monitoring the media. You’re going to feel like you get more than your share of news, but I’d challenge you to go beyond your company or your clients’ industry news. Read The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, CNN.com, CNBC.com and the like. Knowing what’s happening in the world, even if it doesn’t have a direct tie to your day-to-day job, will add context to what you’re working on and will help you understand better what is newsworthy.

Ask for opportunities.

Don’t let your title hold you back. If you want to take a stab at owning a project, ask for it!  Bonus points if you can identify a need that your bosses and co-workers aren’t even aware of yet. “I noticed many of our contacts are out of date. Is it ok if I spend some time updating our company’s broadcast media list?” You’ll get noticed.

Don’t just write. Write well.

Quality writing is the most surefire way to stand out as a new PR professional. In particular, knowing how to translate a more complicated topic into something that’s easily digestible for your client or reporter’s audience is key to success.  Study the OpEd pages of your local newspaper. Ask senior staff for tips on how to write clearly and concisely. Also, knowing AP Style and proper grammar and punctuation is critical!

Learn to love feedback.

It can be hard to hear that your pitch didn’t hit the mark, or your project management skills need improvement. However, it’s also one of the most effective ways to learn. When you get feedback from someone, whether it be a colleague, account manager or a mentor (inside or outside of your organization), challenge yourself to DO something with it.

Differentiate yourself.

Whatever your first job, chances are you won’t be there forever. At some point, you’ll move on to a new opportunity. When you do, it helps to have a personal/professional brand that is unique and is going to stand out from the flood of others with the same training. Look for opportunities to dig deeper and develop skills that will set you apart.

Request informational interviews.

If you’re still looking for the right job or post-graduate internship, don’t be afraid to ask for an informational interview, even if the company that you want to work for doesn’t have a position available. It’s a great way to build relationships and learn more about the company or field that could pay dividends in the future.

Good luck, graduates! I hope you all find success, excitement and fulfillment in your PR career. One last tip: Don’t forget to join PRSA!

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Consider a Long Term Commitment to Talent Development

Think of your talent development plan long term.

Think of your talent development plan long term, one that helps change behavior, habits, limiting beliefs, and culture over the long hall.

By Freddi Donner, PCC, Team Engagement Specialist

It’s gratifying to see companies initiate changes in their organizations by inviting their leadership to
gather for a day or two to do a deep dive into their way of relating to one another. Usually, these events
help build awareness, open dialogue and urge people to see things from a different perspective.

The participants stop the work to notice how they are working. However, the shelf-life of this often expensive effort is very short and the results that are produced are short term at best.

Think of this in terms of any dramatic change you want in your life: whether you’re thinking of changing careers, gaining or losing weight, building physical strength, fortifying relationships, enhancing your
spirituality, or learning a new language, real change, permanent change, takes time. Real change
requires a long term commitment to a process with repetition, multidimensional training and coaching,
accountability calls, checkups, and demonstrations as support.

Now think of your talent development plan…long term. Instead of thinking about a two day “getaway,”
think about a one to two year investment, one that helps change behavior, habits, limiting beliefs, and
culture over the long hall. One that builds on a series of content that bring a compound affect to the
investment.

And budgeting? How much is this going to cost – is often asked. Although there is no wrong
answer, I do encourage people to think of % of improvement. If you could improve how the team
operates by 10%, what would that look like? What would be happening more of/less of with this
investment? And then build the program around that outcome.

Then, think about taking at least 10% of a person’s salary, and setting that amount aside to invest in them over that 1-2 years. Trust me, if you are not making this minimal investment in them, you are losing the money in other ways – including low energy, malaise, gossiping/complaining, struggling with conflict or stress, and a myriad of other “leaks” in your system.

The talent wars are real. You want better people? Build them internally – invest in them right where
they are on your team. Just like you wouldn’t use cheap steel to build a bridge because it will fail down
the road, don’t skimp here – the costs of a low investment can be life threatening to your bottom line.

About the Author

Freddi Donner is a seasoned executive coach specializing in the power of communication and interpersonal skills to achieve professional growth and business development goals. Freddi founded Business Stamina in 2004 after more than two decades as a corporate marketing executive and successful entrepreneur. She is certified by the International Coaching Federation and is an Authorized Facilitator of Team Coaching International. A thought leader on leadership skills, communication styles, stress management, and teamwork, Freddi provides team and individual coaching for public and private companies, government agencies, and associations. Most of her clients are technical experts who want to learn to connect better with a variety of personality types for the sake of being a more profound leader and increasing followership.

Is Honesty the Best Policy?

 By Meagan Price

“Honesty is the best policy!” It was Benjamin Franklin’s mantra we all learned at a very young age.  While parents everywhere have convinced their children this is true, the corporate world seems to live by “honesty is an ‘okay-maybe-it-works-sometimes’ policy.”

We’ve all seen countless examples of dishonesty in the news and in real life — name your politician, Fortune 500 company, or even your neighbor. We’ve all witnessed how and when a lie comes back to bite the liar and it’s not pretty. I believe that dishonesty has a bigger bite in the business world, particularly in employee engagement and company morale metrics.

In a 2017 New Tech Benchmark study done by Culture Amp, companies with highly engaged employees consistently scored high on employee communications metrics. In Quantum Metrics’ Employee Engagement Survey, only 26% of respondents believed their organization provided honesty and transparency when making changes. Companies that encouraged honest feedback among their employees outperformed competitors by 270% over a 10-year period, according to a 2010 Corporate Executive Board study.

I’ve worked for clients that believed their employees should be the first to know company news, and as a result, employees felt invested in the company’s future. I’ve also dealt with clients that considered employees an afterthought, and consequently employees did not consider their leadership trustworthy. The difference in employee morale was stark.

Employees are entitled to know as much of the story as can legally be shared. They’re your team members and your best assets to bring your company success. Company leaders need to approach their employees as allies and as their company’s best marketing ambassadors.

Employees crave honesty. They need straightforward, no-bull communication from their leaders. Employees can spot a “line” from a mile away. Tell your employees the truth about your company strategy, goals and even finances. Maybe the financial news isn’t great but use communication as an opportunity to share how you’re making it better, what the commitment level is from leadership, and how your employees can help the company succeed.

A motivated employee is your best employee. The corporate world should not discount honesty as the “okay-maybe-it-works-sometimes” policy. It’s the foundation to success. If your employees believe in their leaders, they’ll do whatever it takes to help their company succeed.

About the Author

Meagan Price is an independent communications consultant with nearly 20 years of experience in employee communications. She excels in strategic communications planning, change management communications, and senior leadership writing. Ms. Price uses a blend of creativity, the latest communications trends and a healthy dose of common sense to deliver results for her clients. Connect on LinkedIn @MeaganPrice.

 

 

Looking for Agencies in all the Wrong Places

By Robert Udowitz, RFP Associates

Whether you’re on the agency or client side of public relations, you’ve no doubt encountered the Request for Proposal – or simply, RFP. It’s a bane to most everyone’s existence for a multitude of reasons yet, by design, it truly is the best way to solicit PR services or respond to the need for them.

Naysayers forget that RFPs span most industries and are a generally accepted method of doing business. In fact, when done well – and by that, I mean comprehensively and transparent – they should serve as the most efficient method of agency selection.

In today’s frantic-paced communications departments it’s difficult to devote the resources to create an RFP and identify the right agencies. But how can you consider hiring a public relations firm that you’re willing to pay, say, $250k or more a year – equal to the cost of several employees – without taking the proper precautions to screen, review, test, and verify those firms?

The average search takes 150-200 hours. Surprised? Look at your clock and consider that you need to build a review team, develop the budget, draft the initial RFP, pre-screen agencies (to ensure expertise and eliminate those with conflicts), read/re-read and evaluate all those responses, schedule presentations, and then make a final selection – all while you manage your department without the agency you desperately need.

So what should you do? Here are a few ideas:

  • When searching for an agency, first look inward. Assess your goals and needs AND your current structure’s ability to manage an outside firm.
  • Build an initial search team to set the tone and goals. Doing so will commit a group to strict responsibilities and deadlines that have to be adhered.
  • Create a scorecard from the very beginning, too, so each step of the way you can fairly evaluate and compare what each agency has to offer.

Today’s pool of agency choices is greater than ever before. The large firms have expanded their services and built fully integrated teams. On the other hand, there are many good, smaller specialty firms and independent practitioners that have sprung up that are nimble and cost-effective.

The time and effort it takes to hire a PR firm should begin a long and mutually beneficial relationship. By putting the necessary time, thought and energy on the front-end you’ll become a much more satisfied client that never has to look back with regrets and bemoan your agency to colleagues.

About the Author

Robert Udowitz is a principal with agency search firm RFP Associates, LLC. He can be found at www.rfpassociates.net

Sorry

sorryBy Karen Naumann, APR, Vice President at Susan Davis International

Apologies abound. From political figures, religious institutions, entertainers, corporations, there seems to be an apology issued in the public domain every week.

Crisis Response

For professional communicators, the apology is an attempt to restore the image of the entity or person, preserve the business/organization, and minimize damage after a crisis. However, simply saying “sorry” is not the proper response for every crisis as academia’s Situational Crisis Communication Theory would inform.

Before taking a message position, culpability should first be carefully considered. Ask, “Was the person or organization actual the victim? Did the situation arise through unavoidable circumstances or unknown factors?” If the answer is “yes,” then “sorry” is not the response.

  • If there is clearly another blame-worthy party, then the message positioning could shift blame to the culprit and attack the accuser of the false accusation.
  • If there is some negligible responsibility to be taken, then minimizing role and justifying choices may be the best message positioning.
  • If, however, responsibility for a tragic and avoidable situation falls with your client or organization, then “sorry” is only the beginning. Compensation to those affected and demonstrating authentic change is immediately required.

This is a simplistic framework of crisis message positioning. The content of the crisis response will likely be multi-layered.

Sometimes the foundational messaging framework is followed by necessary instructional information for those affected by the crisis. Instructional information can be actions taken to correct or mitigate the threat of the crisis for stakeholders. Also, expressions of compassion and sympathy may need to be part of the messaging, especially if there was a loss of human life.

Regardless of response message positioning selected, always be transparent, accurate and swift.

Once the Smoke Clears

The above addresses crisis response messaging. Issuing the messaging and fielding media inquiries is not the end of the crisis.

Post crisis is comprised of follow up actions and changes to avoid similar crises in the future. The benefit of time to make sense of a crisis may be an opportunity to issue a report stemming from investigations into the crisis and the actions taken to prevent another going forward.

A thorough report can set the record straight and restore faith in an organization.

The Best Offense Is a Good Defense

In the end, the best crisis is the one that never happens. Preventing crisis should be job #1 for the professional communicator.

Pre-crisis scenario building is pivotal to that risk management role. Scenario building is a strategic-planning technique that projects multiple future situations for an organization.

While there is no rigid scenario building process, the most respected models are rooted in James E. Grunig’s work. Steps to consider include:

  1. Conduct environmental scanning of stakeholders, influences, trends
  2. Identify issues emerging from environmental scan
  3. Zero in on areas of potential crisis, such as legal/regulatory, physical locations, internal employees and clientele
  4. Examine the intersection of issues, stakeholders, influences, trends, and areas of potential crisis
  5. Create response frameworks for the potential crises identified.

sorry2

Additionally, actively preparing the crisis response team for the most likely scenarios for an organization is a common initiative led by communicators. These efforts should go beyond the crisis response team to prepare the entire organization from the top down and to open dialogue that promotes deep understanding of what stakeholders think of the most probable crises.

Additionally, communicators, along with internal leadership, should proactively work toward mitigating the circumstances that may lead to the crisis in the first place.

About the Author

Karen Naumann, APR is a Vice President at Susan Davis International, a Washington D.C.-based public relations and public affairs firm. She is a member of the PRSA-NCC Board of Directors.

25 Criteria to Review Before Writing for PR Purposes

By Don Bates, APR, Fellow PRSA, PRSA-NCC Writing Workshop Instructor

(Next Washington, D.C., workshop, April 30, 8:30-4:30, at The George Washington University. )

Before you write anything for professional public relations purposes, you need to review these 25 accepted criteria to ensure that your assignment is well-written, its structure is correct and its content is sensitive to the needs and interests of the target audience.

These criteria apply to all PR writing. They are based on what PR managers, writers, researchers, journalists, editors, teachers and consultants consider as essential based on their professional knowledge, experience and expertise.

Print the list, which is alphabetical, on a large note card or half sheet of paper you can attach to your computer, printer, bookcase or somewhere else close at hand where you can easily read it.

  1. Accurate
  2. Actionable
  3. AP styled
  4. Attributed
  5. Audience-centric
  6. Benefits focused
  7. Clear
  8. Concise
  9. Credible
  10. Direct
  11. Engaging
  12. Evaluated
  13. Factual
  14. Incisive
  15. Informative
  16. Insightful
  17. Logical
  18. Measured in tone
  19. Persuasive
  20. Positive
  21. Readable
  22. Researched
  23. Simply stated
  24. Strategic
  25. Substantiated

Please share the list with colleagues, students, clients and employers. You have my permission.

About the Author

Don Bates, APR, Fellow PRSA, is a well-known PR/PA executive, writer, teacher and consultant. He has worked for national and international corporations, nonprofit causes, professional associations and agencies. He conducts writing workshops worldwide. He has taught in China, Japan, Singapore, Italy, Switzerland, Peru, Spain and other countries. Don also teaches graduate public relations courses at New York University and is a senior advisor on PR agency M&A with Gould Partners. He owned and operated The Bates Company, NY/DC-based PR and marketing firm, which he sold after 12 years in business. He is a member of the PRSA-NCC and PRSA-NY chapters, and an honorary trustee of the Institute for Public Relations, which he helped to establish.

Hobby Your Way to CEO

By Helen Sullivan, APR, Fellow PRSA

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Are you working too hard to have time for a hobby? Rethink that. If you want to move up the corporate ladder, get a hobby. That’s the takeaway from a fascinating article in the October 2018 Harvard Business Review (HBR).

According to HBR, many CEOs of top companies in the United States have one thing in common: they make time for hobbies they are passionate about, and those hobbies enhance, rather than detract from, their ability to succeed.

According to the article, David Solomon, CEO of Goldman Sachs, moonlights as a DJ. Brian Roberts, CEO of Comcast, plays squash. Whether they’re cycling, studying Taekwondo, being a drummer in a band, playing basketball, building a collection, flying airplanes or fishing, these CEOs don’t just play, they excel. Many attribute their hobbies to their success—teaching them lessons in humility and authentic leadership, providing a true escape, helping them learn never to quit and finding ways to be their best.

My favorite quote was from Andy Wilson, CEO of Electronic Arts, who said, “I train a lot of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and you know, when someone’s trying to take your head off, you pretty much can only think about that.”

Down time is much needed time to refresh your body and soul. Don’t feel guilty on that golf course, race course or online art course–you need that, and maybe your career needs it, too.

Originally posted on the IPMI Blog of the International Parking & Mobility Institute