Michael Smart delivered a solid repeat performance on June 29 of his two half-day workshops: Pitching Bootcamp and Building Media Relationships

Session One – Pitching Bootcamp: by Ana Pinilla, BusinessWire

Michael SmartThe Morning Session “Pitching Bootcamp” started with Michael talking about the problems PR practitioners can encounter when pitching journalists and went on to offer his “pitching playbook” where he discussed several examples of how to do it right – starting off with turning a press release from boring to glowing – making it into something newsworthy that journalists will want to use as part of their reporting.  It’s also about finding the angle for the story – one that could be holiday or seasonally related, a story with human impact, or even proximity to where we live and work, as well as other ideas. Michael went on to discuss the anatomy of a perfect pitch that included appropriate phone and/or email introductions and how to deliver the story with speed and interest. But with all this being said, success also depends on knowing the journalists – what they write about and knowing their style. What was particularly helpful was that Michael provided audio and video examples of pitches – with lots of do’s and don’ts – that made it all so much easier and real to attendees.

 

Session Two – Going Beyond the Pitch: Why Relationship Building Matters: by , News Generation

Michael SmartAs PR pros, we know the importance of building and strengthening our relationships with reporters. This was the focus of PRSA-NCC’s recent series of workshops with media relations expert Michael Smart. During the workshops, Smart offered participants hands-on, practical tips and social media suggestions on how to engage and build relationships with members of the media.

The most important theme he stressed is that you must invest in your relationships with the media. Invest the time and brain space. It is a critical component of your job and helps us be more effective at what we do.

Also, pay attention to what journalists are covering. Engage with their material. Show them that you are following them, that you genuinely care about what they’re reporting. Doing so will help separate you from other PR pros. Learn their style and pitch them in a personal, customized way, and become a credible resource to journalists. When pitching, it’s equally important to show that that we’re respectful of a journalist’s time and deadlines.

(*re-published from News Generation: http://www.newsgeneration.com/2016/07/01/relationship-building-matters-michael-smart-prsa/)

Finding the Best Research Method: PRSA-NCC Event

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Pictured: Molly O’Rourke, Sultana Ali, Danny Selnick, Peter Kelley

Pictured: Molly O’Rourke, Sultana Ali, Danny Selnick, Peter Kelley

Research plays an imperative role in the way we communicate messages and attract consumers. Research can be performed internally, using an outside company’s help, or through an external source. The steps to conduct effective research were discussed during the June 16th PRSA event, “Numbers Don’t Lie: The Role of Research in Successful Communications.” Moderator Danny Selnick, Senior Vice President of Strategic Markets at Business Wire, panelists Molly O’Rourke, Partner at Hart Research and Peter Kelley, Vice President of Public Affairs at American Wind Energy Association, evaluated the importance of research in the communications industry.

Molly O’Rourke offered key takeaways on the role of strategic communication and public opinion research in a corporate environment. She emphasized that having strong research can attract media attention, enhance communication abilities, assist with gaining political allies, identify a target market, and increase internal company effectiveness. Important choices to make when conducting research include whether to use a focus group or survey, choosing the most effective sample size, and what audience should be included in the research.

Peter Kelley discussed the importance of accessing free research and how to limit research costs for companies with smaller budgets. Kelley outlined options for “polling without your own pollster” in order to reduce operating costs for your company. In the age of the internet, research can easily be accessed for free. Benefits of opinion research include having the ability to refine messages from gathered information. Oftentimes, using big name pollsters or bipartisan research groups is recommended because they resonate more support with the public.

Moderator Danny Selnick addressed the question of the role of cell phones in making polling more difficult. O’Rourke responded by emphasizing methodological issues in this technological age and how one should go about using different platforms for polling. Hybrid research methods of using online and phone surveys are often used to address a larger market and to receive wider audience participation. Platforms for polling are constantly changing and it is difficult to say one clear cut method is the best. Kelley made clear that transparency is key if you want to eliminate skepticism in the audience to attract a larger support base for your poll. Both emphasized the importance of wording and using unbiased phrases when polling.

Research plays an important role in our lives, and is necessary in continuing company growth and development. Businesses are able to better understand their target audience with imperial data, and the company is able to adjust their messages to be more successful. Research is both an art and a science —you have to try different methods to find what works best.

Stay tuned…

 

(*re-published from News Generation: http://www.newsgeneration.com/2016/06/20/research-method-prsancc/)

Sponsor Spotlight: Van Eperen

Every month or so, we are going to highlight a chapter sponsor so you can learn more about them, and possibly connect with them as they have done so much to support our chapter. We want to thank Laura Van Eperen, Founder and CEO of Van Eperen, for participating in the spotlight. Here are the details:

Laura Van Eperen, Founder and CEO of Van Eperen

Laura Van Eperen, Founder and CEO of Van Eperen

Q: Tell us more about Van Eperen and your role there:
Answer: Van Eperen is an award-winning, integrated communications agency that serves regional, national and international clients in the public and private sectors. We blend PR, digital, social and creative strategies to drive meaningful results. I founded Van Eperen in 2004 to deliver on promises made to clients during the search process. I worked as a broadcast journalist for five years and then transitioned to communications. In total, I’ve been telling stories for 23 years. Ethics, integrity, responsiveness and results are what drive me and my team of technology-savvy communicators who integrate innovative methods with proven principles.

Q: How long has Van Eperen been involved with PRSA-NCC?
Answer: Our Senior Vice President, Karen Addis, APR, has been an active member of the chapter for 30 years. In fact, the chapter recently profiled her in a Member Spotlight.

Q: Is there anything you want to tell our members about Van Eperen that we may not know?
Answer: When we say integrated, customized communications, we mean it. Van Eperen is up-to-date on the latest and greatest digital communications tools and technologies. We incorporate new platforms, processes and channels with traditional tried-and-true public relations practices to drive results for clients. From live-streaming videos, designing and developing websites, we can conceptualize and execute full digital campaigns as well as pick up the phone and land traditional media.

Q: What do you like best about working with Van Eperen so far?
Answer: The best thing about working at Van Eperen is the level of collaboration. We are a team of high-achieving seasoned strategists and practitioners and there are times when we are all in the conference room just brainstorming or collaborating on a single project. It’s always interesting to hear the new ideas and approaches from our millennial staff and it’s great to work directly with them on a regular basis because we learn so much from each other. We produce excellent client results because we are always on our toes.

Q: How can our members learn VanEperen_logo_tagline_RGBmore, get more information about what Van Eperen has to offer?
Answer: Members can visit our website at www.vaneperen.com, follow us on Twitter (@VanEperenAgency) and like us on Facebook. Feel free take a look at some of our blogs and join our mailing list to receive helpful content.

Five Ways to Know if Your PR Campaign is Thoth Award Material

By Robert V. Krueger, Senior Director, Public Relations & Social Media at the Urban Land Institute

From left to right: Sandra Wills Hannon, Ph.D., APR, Principal, The Hannon Group, @Willshannon; Jeff Wilson, APR, Senior Director, Business Develoment & Agency Marketing, PadillaCRT, @Wilson0507; Brigitte Johnson, APR, Adjunct Professor, Marymount University, @JohnsonHerronB; and standing Sultana Ali, APR, PRSA-NCC

From left to right: Sandra Wills Hannon, Ph.D., APR, Principal, The Hannon Group, @Willshannon; Jeff Wilson, APR, Senior Director, Business Develoment & Agency Marketing, PadillaCRT, @Wilson0507; Brigitte Johnson, APR, Adjunct Professor, Marymount University, @JohnsonHerronB; and standing Sultana Ali, APR, PRSA-NCC

Every week public relations agencies, non-profits, government agencies, and private in-house communications teams research, design, and execute a variety of campaigns that help their clients achieve certain goals. But, many outstanding campaigns never receive their due recognition.

For years, public relations practitioners have entered their campaigns into industry competitions. In addition, it can be seen as a badge of honor for organizations and individuals to attach a communications award to their portfolio. But, submitting entries for a Public Relations Society of America – National Capital Chapter (PRSA-NCC) Thoth Award or any other PR and communication award can be an intimidating process that is full of uncertainty.

A recent PRSA-NCC panel offered insight into the process and sought to break any myths surrounding what types of campaigns – both big and small – are worthy of winning Washington’s most prestigious award.  The panelists were: Jeff Wilson, APR, Senior Director, Business Development & Agency Marketing, PadillaCRT; Sandra Wills Hannon, Ph.D., APR, Principal, The Hannon Group; Brigitte Johnson, APR, Adjunct Professor, Marymount University; and the discussion was moderated by Sultana Ali, APR, PRSA-NCC President & Communications Officer at The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Based on their discussion, below is a list of five ways you can decide whether your campaign should be submitted for a Thoth award:

  1. Perform a broad-stroke litmus test: First ask yourself whether your campaign was compelling and whether there were clear, measurable objectives that were achieved. Second, did it include a well-designed and clear strategic plan or was it simply tactical? Third, was it beautifully executed? Finally, and perhaps most importantly, is there evidence that your goals were achieved?
  2. Check if there was a clear demonstration of research: If you pass the litmus test, you must be able to prove you utilized primary and/or secondary research in designing your plan. Judges of any PR competition always want to see a foundation of research. Before developing a campaign, you should do an environmental scan and see if there is any secondary research available that is applicable to your goals. In addition, even if you do not have the budget to conduct primary research, many organizations choose the more affordable route and latch on to other firms’ research through omnibus.
  3. Determine whether the execution was both targeted and strategic: Was your campaign planning targeted and based on your research? Did you have a primary and secondary audience? If securing media placements was one of your tactics, did the outlets that covered you make sense regarding target audience and objectives?
  4. Evaluate whether your results were both measurable and mirrored your objectives: Was the execution appropriate to the audience you were targeting? Did the target of the execution match the target audience of your client’s goals? Also determine whether your campaign results data proved whether goals were achieved. When doing this, make sure each result matches each stated objective.
  5. Be able to state your client’s problem and how you solved it: Judges always want to see if your submission can explain what the problem was for your client—and how your campaign helped solve that problem.
thoth2

Susan Matthews Apgood, News Generation, Inc., kicks off the event

Of course it is always best to keep these things in mind before you research and design a campaign. The panel suggested to always craft a campaign as if you would one day submit it to a competition. An additional piece of advice offered was to serve as a judge for other communication competitions, get additional training through PRSA’s APR accreditation, and to review the entries of winning submissions – all which can help you become familiar with the components of a winning entry.

The early bird deadline is June 13, and the final deadline is July 11. For details on submitting, please visit: http://www.prsa-ncc.org/thoth_awards.

Every Day is World Day for Cultural Diversity for the PR Professional

by Susan Hess

Image Courtesy: Union of National Employees

(Image Courtesy: Union of National Employees)

In December 2002, the United Nations General Assembly declared May 21 to be the World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development. By marking this day, we have an opportunity to better understand and appreciate the values associated with cultural diversity, and in turn, the potential to learn to live together more harmoniously.

Nine years later, in 2011, a grassroots campaign Do One Thing for Diversity and Inclusion— was launched by the UN Alliance of Civilizations and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The campaign’s three objectives are to:

  • raise awareness about the importance of intercultural dialogue;
  • build a community of individuals committed to support diversity with real and everyday life gestures;
  • improve understanding and cooperation among people from different cultures to combat stereotypes.

In the world of Public Relations, we are often responsible for bringing diversity to the forefront by helping others better understand cultural differences and the value those differences bring to the organization. We fight stereotypes constantly through the articles we write, the statements we tweet and the photos and images we place in publications and on the web. We include the perspectives our different team members bring to our projects. We communicate the value diversity brings to our world, either intentionally or unintentionally, in everything we do. We “Do One Thing…” every day just by being PR professionals.

So, although May 21 may be the World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development, let’s continue to make every day an opportunity to communicate the variety of differences that make our world so interesting and help others to understand and respect those differences.

Note: for more information about the Do One Thing for Diversity and Inclusion program, go to:  facebook.com/DoOneThingforDiversityandInclusion

Networking from a Student’s Perspective

By Patrick Fernandez

George Mason University's Public Relations Student Society of America chapter attended the PRSA-NCC happy hour.

George Mason University’s Public Relations Student Society of America chapter attended the PRSA-NCC happy hour.

Last week I attended a PRSA-NCC networking happy hour catered toward students and entry and junior level public relations professionals. Students and professionals from northern Virginia, Washington D.C., and Maryland attended and were eager to network and share ideas.

A lot of students can find networking to be daunting. I remember when I went to my first networking event, everything was fast-paced and it felt like I had to share every detail of my college experiences in a mere 45 seconds. Networking for the first time reminds me of meeting a significant other’s family for the first time; you have to find a balance between putting your best foot forward while not stepping on someone else’s toes.

When networking, it is important to understand that public relations is a peoples’ business. As intimidating as networking can be, everyone is there to meet others which makes it a little easier. Networking is a great tactic to learn about someone’s job or company they work for, but what makes it even better is when people can create relationships that go beyond professional life. Sure, someone might have an interesting job or might have developed a cool way to measure a brand’s social media sentiment, but what makes networking worthwhile is learning and sharing details about each other’s lives that might not be in their cover letter. Effective networkers share details about themselves but more importantly they are able to listen, comprehend and convey interest in what their peers share with them. To be different is not to change the way you act but simply be yourself at networking events.

PRSA-NCC provides many opportunities for students to network with public relations professionals. After I left this event I realized I truly belong in this industry. I enjoyed being able to network with students at different schools and with professionals who are just beginning their careers.

The success of this event makes me eager to attend future PRSA-NCC functions. As my college career comes to a close I know these experiences are invaluable ways to help boost my brand and make connections in an industry I am passionate about.

Plan, Know Your Role & Listen: PRSA-NCC’s “Is It Really a Crisis?”

By Kelsey Pospisil, News Generation

From left to right: Susan Apgood, Maureen Donahue Hardwick, Nick Peters and Jim Moorhead

Pictured from left to right: Susan Apgood, Maureen Donahue Hardwick, Nick Peters and Jim Moorhead

“Crisis” may mean one thing to one PR pro, and one thing to another. How do you most accurately get a pulse on a situation to know how to react? How can you ensure ahead of time that your team is ready to handle it? These questions and more were the focus of the April 19 Professional Development panel, “Is It Really a Crisis? How to Define a Crisis and When to React.” Moderated by Susan Apgood of News Generation, panelists Maureen Donahue Hardwick of Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP, Jim Moorhead of Burson-Marsteller, and Nick Peters of CommCore Consulting Group shared their tips on evaluating and navigating a crisis.

CommCore’s Nick Peters started the session by offering some key advice: going over lessons learned after a crisis is absolutely essential, determine if a crisis is in fact a crisis, and know ahead of time who you sector is, who your stakeholders are, and who your audience is. Peters stressed that just because you determine a situation is a containable emergency, doesn’t mean there isn’t a potential long-term reputational issue based on perception rather than facts.

Maureen Hardwick of Drinker Biddle & Reath said that as a lawyer herself, it’s important for lawyers to be comfortable with crisis communication in order to truly be partners with clients. There are things to prepare and understand in advance, before something big hits. She suggested engaging and partnering with professionals who know what they’re talking about beforehand. Jim Moorhead of Burson-Marsteller gave three best practices to follow in a crisis situation: Figure out what the real threat is, think outside in, and speed kills. Moorhead says that clients need to know three things: “Am I going to be okay,” “Is the situation under control” and “Are you doing the right thing?”

All three panelists stressed the importance of having a set, prepared team in place ahead of time. Have a team who knows their roles before a crisis hits. Peters said the determination of whether something is a crisis or not may or may not always be clear, and that the composition of the crisis team is critical. He suggests a cross-functional crisis team to include HR, Programs, Legal, the Executive Suite, the Communications team, and IT. Hardwick said, “If everyone has the client’s interest in mind, it’s only in our best interest to work better together.” Moorhead suggested the use of pre-approved statements, at least as a general guide, which would then need to be tailored to the particular circumstance.

Crisis Panel

Pictured from left to right: Susan Apgood, Maureen Donahue Hardwick, Nick Peters and Jim Moorhead

Moderator Susan Apgood asked the panelists what tools they would suggest for the audience to help in their crisis communications plans. Peters suggested a literal wheel that contains every single channel, and who is responsible for each channel. He also suggested a decision tree that states if Joe is not available, then Joanne will do it, and if Joanne is not available then Bill will do it. Finally, he suggested having a dark website that can go up immediately in the event of a crisis.

Moorhead emphasized the benefits of survey research – getting to the right community and understanding what people’s perceptions are. You’ll find out: What are effective messages? How would your opponents respond to those messages? What messages work the best in this situation? Who is the best messenger? Hardwick highlighted the importance of being aware of how people are taking information. Be compassionate, honest and interactive – give people a way to comment and be understood. Or in other words, listen to them. There are no downsides to listening, while there are a lot of downsides to talking too much.